How SMART goals can help you realize your dreams. SMART is an acronym generally attributed to Peter Drucker, who described himself as a social ecologist. Although Drucker's writings were for the corporate world, SMART goal principles are easily applied on a personal level. There are different versions of the acronym. I will use the one [...]

How SMART goals can help you realize your dreams.

SMART is an acronym generally attributed to Peter Drucker, who described himself as a social ecologist. Although Drucker's writings were for the corporate world, SMART goal principles are easily applied on a personal level.

There are different versions of the acronym. I will use the one Craig Perra, http://www.theconnectioncoaches.com, uses in his life coaching. Craig helps his clients realize their dreams through SMART goals.

SMART GOALS

S- Specific

M- Measurable

A- Attainable

R- Relevant

T- Time Bound

Suppose you want to get in shape. How would that apply to the SMART goals?

Specific

Saying that you want to “get in shape” isn't specific.

Examples of specific fitness goals:

1. I want to lose 10 pounds in three months.
2. I want to run a mile in 9 minutes.
3. I want to have 15% bodyfat.

Measurable

Getting in shape can be your overall goal but you are going to set goals that can be measured. The more specific your goals are, the more measurable.

For example, you can easily measure if you are reaching your goal of losing 10 pounds, during weekly weigh-ins. Or you can measure your progress in running a 9 minute mile by tracking your time each time you run, and so forth.

Attainable

You can see that these three goals are specific and measurable. What about attainable? Attainability depends upon the individual. If the goal overwhelms you, ask yourself if it is honestly attainable for you.

Anybody can lose 10 lbs. But it is not attainable if it is overwhelming. Maybe start with setting a goal of one pound a month.

Craig tells his clients to set goals that are ridiculously simple. If you haven't worked out for 10 years, start small. Make a goal to work out for five minutes for three days a week, instead of thirty minutes.

If your diet is chock full of junk food, don't set a goal of not eating sweets six days a week. It would be more attainable to start by eliminating processed carbs at dinner. If you set smaller goals, you are less likely to get discouraged and quit.

Having small goals gives you a chance to get accustomed to making progress in that area. It gives your actual motivation level time to catch up with your dreams.

Relevant

Let's say that one of your fitness objectives is to save up money to enroll in a nutritionist certification program. This isn't really relevant. It might be something you can do place under career or financial goals, but it is not necessary for getting in shape. You can get in shape without spending a lot of money or having expertise in the area of nutrition.

Keep it simple and stick to the goal at hand.

Time bound

One of the reasons SMART works is that it requires periodic and frequent monitoring. I monitor my own goals daily. This helps me to evaluate if my objectives for that day fall under my goals. I can also be constantly evaluating if my goals are still attainable and relevant.

Write down your goals for the month. Make them dream-driven. It can be a dream of keeping your house clean for company, or a dream of pursuing a career. Set daily objectives to help you reach your goals. Review them daily and again before you begin a new week. It is a great way to keep your goals in the forefront of your mind, and a great way to celebrate your successes.

And remember…

“What you get by achieving your goals is not as important as what you become by achieving your goals- Zig Ziglar”