A Ripley man has been accused of striking a bicyclist and leaving him for dead on West Virginia 21, Jackson County Sheriff's Department Chief Deputy Ross Mellinger said Thursday.

John Wesley Hall, 43, 79 Aspen Ridge Road, Ripley, was charged with leaving the scene of an accident causing personal injury or death.

Mellinger said the victim was lucky to be alive, having sustained six broken vertebrae, three broken ribs, and internal injuries.

“He basically left him for dead in the ditch,” Mellinger said. “He was riding north on Route 21, and this car came up behind him and literally ran him over. It just completely trashed the front end of the vehicle, and the guy kept on going. He drove home and, ultimately, took the vehicle and hid it in a garage in Kanawha County.”

The victim was at Camden-Clark Memorial Hospital in Parkersburg as of this writing, Mellinger said.

“He's got a long way ahead of him. Truth be known, it's amazing he's alive,” he said.

The investigation started around 7:45 p.m Tuesday, when the Jackson County 911 Center received a call that an individual on a bicycle had been struck by a vehicle just south of Bibbee Ridge on West Virginia 21. The caller reported the vehicle had left the scene, according to a criminal complaint filed against Hall in Jackson County Magistrate Court.

Lt. T.T. Roberts along with Deputies C.R. Saltsgaver and B.A. DeWees responded to the accident scene along with Jackson County EMS and fire department personnel.

After processing the crash site, Roberts and the other officers began searching for the vehicle.

A witness described the vehicle as a silver sport-utility vehicle. Deputies were able to cross reference part numbers from debris left at the scene to confirm the vehicle was a 2005 Jeep Liberty.

Deputies also began asking for the public's help in identifying the vehicle.

“We got the word out on social media, and his girlfriend saw it the next day and turned him in,” Mellinger said.

Shortly after 10 a.m. Wednesday, Hall and his girlfriend arrived at the Jackson County Sheriff's Department and reported that Hall was the one that struck the individual on the bicycle the previous evening.

According to the criminal complaint, Hall told deputies that he left the Sissonville area sometime after dark and headed home. He got off Interstate 77 at Fairplain and went north towards Ripley. When he got to the top of South Hill, something struck the right front of his vehicle; he told investigators that he assumed it was a deer. Hall then went to his residence at 79 Aspen Ridge Road east of Ripley without stopping to check the damage or returning to the crash site to determine what he had struck.

At his residence, Hall noticed his passenger's side front fender flare was missing, and there was damage to his turn signal and the fender well in the same area, according to the complaint.

Hall called his girlfriend to ask if he could borrow her truck because he had hit something on the way home that caused damage to his vehicle, and he did not want to drive it due to the blinker being nonoperational. Hall then drove back to Sissonville via U.S. 33 to I-77 at Ripley and put his vehicle in her garage, the complaint alleges.

Hall told investigators that he visited his son for about 25 minutes and then drove his girlfriend's truck back to his house.

According to the complaint, Hall told the officers that he did not know that he had struck a person until Wednesday morning when his girlfriend called him at work and told him she had seen a news report about a bicyclist being struck just south of Bibbee Ridge on WV 21. Hall told officers his girlfriend picked him up at his place of employment in Ripley and brought him to the Sheriff's Department.

Mellinger said the public's assistance and the deputies' ability to identify the vehicle through the part numbers of the debris left at the scene brought the investigation to a successful conclusion.

“Honestly, the guys did some really solid police work matching everything up and reaching out to the public and relying on the good morals and scruples of the community to help us out. It really paid off,” Mellinger said.

A Ripley man has been accused of striking a bicyclist Tuesday and leaving him for dead on West Virginia 21, Jackson County Sheriff's Department Chief Deputy Ross Mellinger said Thursday.

John Wesley Hall, 43, 79 Aspen Ridge Road, Ripley, was charged with leaving the scene of an accident causing personal injury or death.

Mellinger said the victim was lucky to be alive, having sustained six broken vertebrae, three broken ribs, and internal injuries.

“He basically left him for dead in the ditch,” Mellinger said. “He was riding north on Route 21, and this car came up behind him and literally ran him over. It just completely trashed the front end of the vehicle, and the guy kept on going. He drove home and, ultimately, took the vehicle and hid it in a garage in Kanawha County.”

The victim was at Camden-Clark Memorial Hospital in Parkersburg as of this writing, Mellinger said.

“He's got a long way ahead of him. Truth be known, it's amazing he's alive,” he said.

The investigation started around 7:45 p.m. Tuesday, when the Jackson County 911 Center received a call that an individual on a bicycle had been struck by a vehicle just south of Bibbee Ridge on West Virginia 21. The caller reported the vehicle had left the scene, according to a criminal complaint filed against Hall in Jackson County Magistrate Court.

Lt. T.T. Roberts along with Deputies C.R. Saltsgaver and B.A. DeWees responded to the accident scene along with Jackson County EMS and Fire Department personnel.

After processing the crash site, Roberts and other officers began searching for the vehicle.

A witness described the vehicle as a silver sport-utility vehicle. Deputies were able to cross reference part numbers from debris left at the scene to confirm the vehicle was a Jeep Liberty.

Deputies also began asking for the public's help in identifying the vehicle.

“We got the word out on social media, and his girlfriend saw it the next day and turned him in,” Mellinger said.

Shortly after 10 a.m. on Wednesday, Hall and his girlfriend arrived at the Jackson County Sheriff's Department and reported that Hall was the one that struck the individual on the bicycle the previous evening.

According to the criminal complaint, Hall told deputies that he left the Sissonville area sometime after dark and headed home. He got off Interstate 77 at Fairplain and went north towards Ripley. When he got to the top of South Hill, something struck the right front of his vehicle; he told investigators that he assumed it was a deer. Hall then went to his residence at 79 Aspen Ridge Road in Ripley without stopping to check the damage or returning to the crash site to determine what he had struck.

At his residence, Hall noticed his passenger's side front fender flare was missing, and there was damage to his turn signal and the fender well in the same area, according to the complaint.

Hall called his girlfriend to ask if he could borrow her truck because he had hit something on the way home that caused damage to his vehicle, and he did not want to drive it due to the blinker being nonoperational. Hall then drove back to Sissonville via U.S. 33 to I-77 at Ripley and put his vehicle in her garage, the complaint alleges.

Hall told investigators that he visited his son for about 25 minutes and then drove his girlfriend's truck back to his house.

According to the complaint, Hall told the officers that he did not know that he had struck a person until Wednesday morning, which was when his girlfriend called him while he was at work and told him that she had seen a news report about a bicyclist struck just south of Bibbee Ridge on WV 21. Hall told officers his girlfriend picked him up at his place of employment in Ripley and brought him to the Sheriff's Department.

Mellinger said the public's assistance and the deputies' ability to identify the vehicle through the part numbers of the debris left at the scene brought the investigation to a successful conclusion.

“Honestly, the guys did some really solid police work matching everything up and reaching out to the public and relying on the good morals and scruples of the community to help us out. It really paid off,” Mellinger said.