KEYSER – Acting on a tip from a resident who reported a suspicious person looking into parked cars, Keyser City Police this weekend arrested a man they believe may be responsible for a recent string of vehicle break-ins in the area.

By Richard Kerns
rkerns@newstribune.info
Tribune Staff Writer
KEYSER – Acting on a tip from a resident who reported a suspicious person looking into parked cars, Keyser City Police this weekend arrested a man they believe may be responsible for a recent string of vehicle break-ins in the area.
In possibly breaking the case, police recovered a large number of electronics, purses and other items that they believe may have been stolen in recent weeks from cars in Keyser and the surrounding area. Police are asking anyone who suffered such a loss – even if it was not reported – to contact the Keyser Station at 304-788-1311 to arrange a time when they can visit the station and see if their property is among the items found with the suspect.
Matthew D. Borror, 24, of Frostburg, was being held Tuesday at Potomac Highlands Regional Jail on $2,700 bond following his arrest in the case Saturday afternoon. Borror grew up in Keyser.
According to Keyser Police, officers responded just after 5 p.m. Saturday to the Reynolds Terrace area, after a caller reported seeing a man looking in the windows of parked cars. Once on the scene, officers found a man on Lincoln Street matching the caller's description and held him for questioning, with officer's reporting that they observed numerous electronic items and other goods in the car belonging to the suspect, Borror.
As they continued questioning Borror, officers received a call reporting a break-in on nearby South Main Street, where the owner of a vehicle reported that a window had been broken out of his car and his iPod stolen.
Police drove to the scene and returned to Lincoln Street with the victim, who positively identified his iPod among the stolen items found in Borror's vehicle.
A police spokesman said Tuesday that the haul from Borror's vehicle included numerous purses, backpacks, electronics and other items typically kept in parked cars. Police are anxious to return the items to their rightful owners, however, the owner must be able to provide a description of the missing item or other proof of ownership such as sales receipts.
"We have recovered a large number of items consistent with vehicle break-ins we've had over the last couple of months," the spokesman said. "There is a host of stuff in here."
Based on items found in Borror's car, police charged him with breaking and entering other than a dwelling, and fraudulent use of a credit card. Those charges are based on an April 13 vehicle theft on Hughes Street that was already being investigated, with evidence implicating Borror found in his car.
Police said Borror kept the items in his car – rather than unload them at his residence after the thefts -- apparently to sell them on the street for quick cash.
They also noted that the boldness of Saturday's break-in on South Main Street – in which a car window was broken in broad daylight – indicates that the perpetrator – allegedly Borror – was becoming bolder and more dangerous in his quest for cash. Most vehicle thefts, police said, occur when thieves enter unlocked cars.
Additional charges are to be filed against Borror as police continue to sort out the evidence gathered this weekend.
Police expect Borror to be included among the Grand Jury indictments set for announcement next week. He is currently being held at the regional jail as a pre-trial felon. Although the vehicle break-ins individually may not equate to a felony offense, when taken in combination as a continuing crime, police said they will easily exceed the $2,000 threshold required for felony theft.
Keyser Police Chief Karen Shoemaker applauded the original caller for reporting the suspicious person near Reynolds Terrace. Without that call, she noted, the case might not have been broken and ever more residents would have suffered losses from vehicle break-ins. The chief has often said that area residents keeping a watch on their neighborhoods serve as the "eyes and ears" of police.
"I can't stress enough how important it is for people to call us," she said. "Nothing is too trivial. If you see something suspicious, call."