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Jackson Newspapers - Ripley, WV
  • ARF rescue mission flies mother dog, pups to new homes in New England

  • On a sunny day, perfect for flying, members of ARF (Animal Rights Fur-ever) joined leader of the pack, Bobbie Chancey, at the Jackson County Airport for another canine rescue mission.
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  • On a sunny day, perfect for flying, members of ARF (Animal Rights Fur-ever) joined leader of the pack, Bobbie Chancey, at the Jackson County Airport for another canine rescue mission.  Jackson County Human Officer, Shelia Chambers, was also in attendance, making this her second time to watch and assist the members of ARF. Chambers stated that a mother with six puppies was flying out of the county to an area of New England. Said Chambers, “Right now, they will go to a rescue group and then they will be either placed in foster care or they have their own homes where the dogs stay until they are adopted. I think it’s wonderful.” According to the Humane Officer, New England has strict laws to promote spaying and neutering. Big fines are given to those who do not spay or neuter their pets. “Here, we have so many stray dogs,” said Chambers. “We do the best that we can to get them adopted, and if that doesn’t work, we always have our foster groups. When a rescue dog is not a good fit for the adoptive family, there is a contract similar to what we have here that says that the adoptive family must bring the animal back. Then the dog goes back into the foster system until they find a fur-ever home. I can’t see anything negative about this at all.” Bobbie Chancey explained all of the paperwork that had to be finished before the flight could take place. “Each dog has to have a packet with a health certificate, rabies shot tags, kennel cards, and the vet bill to prove the animal was spayed or neutered. It’s a lot of paperwork to go through especially when you have multiple dogs,” said Chancey. Kathy Stone assembled a round pen for the puppies and covered the ground beneath the cage. “We don’t let the puppies stand in the grass, so we cover the grass to prevent them from getting Parvo. We also have to bathe or use bath cloths so they are clean. At the request of the pilot, we will even spray each of them with doggie perfume,” said Stone. ARF member, Eric Denemark brought the furry family to the airport. He had fostered the mother and pups since they were only nine days old. He found out at the vet’s office that the mother had been shot a while back ago and still had fragments from the bullets inside her. Despite the fragments, which the veterinarian said were better off to stay where they were and signs of recently being spayed, the mother seemed to be in good shape. However as the puppies were still nursing, a shirt was put on her and was tied to prevent the pups from nursing and to also protect the incision. While the pilot gassed up the plane, last minute preparations were made to ensure all of the paperwork was there as well as other needed supplies for the passengers. One by one, mom and pups were loaded into the plane and with a wave from the pilot, the dogs were on their way to a new home—hopefully, a fur-ever home.
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