Following their regular meeting Thursday, County Commissioners asked to clear up some misinformation regarding the status of donations to the Jackson County Animal Shelter.


Following their regular meeting Thursday, County Commissioners asked to clear up some misinformation regarding the status of donations to the Jackson County Animal Shelter. 

In a recent interview with Jackson Newspapers, the Jackson County Humane Society stated that donations to the county Animal Shelter were not tax-deductible and were placed in the county’s General Fund. 

According to Commissioner Tommy Nutter, that claim is not true. 

Commissioners said donations to the Animal Shelter are fully tax-deductible and are placed in a separate county fund (Fund 020) for the sole purpose of being used for the Animal Shelter. 

According to paperwork supplied by Commission Administrative Assistant Sandy Garrett, for the current fiscal year, the fund saw a carryover of $5,539 from last fiscal year and has received $1,858.23 in private donations so far this fiscal year.  Each donation is logged individually in the fund’s general ledger.

Nutter pointed out that, contrary to the Humane Society’s claims of providing $150 a month to the shelter for cat care supplies, the shelter has only received one check from the Humane Society in the past year – that being a $150 check that was donated on September 18. 

So far this fiscal year, the county has used $892.47 of Animal Shelter donation revenue to purchase Animal Shelter materials and supplies along with supplies for cat care. 

The Commission also clarified how Dog Tax revenues are used by the county, saying those funds are not directly used for the Animal Shelter. 

According to Commissioner Don Stephens, the Dog Tax fund was set up as a type of insurance policy for the county in order to pay livestock claims from animal attacks that the county receives each year. 

Each year, the county collects approximately $13,000 to $15,000 in dog tax revenue.  This money is set aside until the end of each fiscal year, when commissioners conduct a review of all livestock claims the county has received that year. 

Stephens said after all claims are reviewed and paid, if there is any excess revenue in the fund, that money will be transferred to the county’s General Fund and can be used for the Animal Shelter the following fiscal year.  However, if claims exceed the revenue available, the shortfall will be taken from the general fund. 

In FY2009, the county received $15,365.67 in Dog Tax revenue. 

Of that, $2,212.25 was used to pay for supplies including dog tags, rabies tags, and record books; no livestock claims were made during the fiscal year, so the remaining balance of $13,153.42 was transferred to the county’s General Fund for the new fiscal year. 

In FY2008, the county did receive $2,668.33 in livestock claims from three individuals and paid additional appraisal fees of $118.08.